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credit John J Tackett

credit John J Tackett

Prominent and stylish, boxwoods are a staple for EVERY home.

As my family moved from the east to west coast, my design aesthetic adapted to my new environment. Gone was my desire for a traditional Colonial, I was overcome with the charming appeal of the spanish bungalows nestled in my new northern California neighborhood.

At first glance, the landscaping in my new surroundings was just as different as the architecture. Sure, some things are different. There are a few palm trees thrown into the skyline and the occasional bird of paradise, but for the most part the players are the same just the games has changed.

Replacing the stately and untamed beauty of generous english boxwoods, often ornamenting front doors by the pair, in my old neighborhood are the sleek and highly stylized boxwood topiaries of California. Though executed differently, boxwoods still have the same effect. Commanding attention and adding instant curb appeal, boxwoods make any home look luxurious.

Land Park Neighborhood Sacramento, California

Land Park Neighborhood Sacramento, California

Just like interior design, landscape design is all about layering. Establish a theme by planting a row of boxwoods that will mature into a seamless hedge to trim out flower beds.

credit Southern Living

credit Southern Living

Hedge-Deborah Silver

credit Deborah Silver

Boxwood hedges look great with a curved design, so if you have an opportunity plant them in a circle around the base of a tree. For your second layer, choose an architectural feature of your house to bring attention to such as the front entry or a large window. Anchor a pair of large, round boxwood shrubs  to highlight this feature. If your facade is asymmetric, you may only need one.

credit Southern Living

credit Southern Living

For your final layer, incorporate some boxwood (I also like ivy) topiaries. Be subtle, it is easy to over-do this! One of my favorite looks is a two-ball topiaries in a black box planter with white annuals planted at the base.

credit House Logic

credit House Logic

credit The Enchanted Home

credit The Enchanted Home

No need to stop at the front door, there is room for boxwoods inside too! Again, be subtle… a little will go a long way. A pair of preserved boxwood balls in petite urns on the mantle is classic, but try to find a more original application. In fact, I prefer preserved boxwood topiaries indoors displayed individually. Mix in with moss balls into your favorite large bowl and leave at the center of your table for an everyday centerpiece. Place in an antique urn and use as a bookend. This will also blend well with any holiday decor.

credit Tone on Tone Antiques

credit Tone on Tone Antiques

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